Don’t Go Cheap on your Steel Church Building

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It’s the vibration of an organ, or the ringing of bells. It might be the echo of a choir, or a resonating voice in a sanctuary. Every church possesses the ability to reach the soul of its congregation in its own way. The unique, uplifting experience provides worshipers fuel for the coming week, for overcoming obstacles and hardships, and a means to believe in a higher power. Church, for many, is an opportunity to engage our hearts and mind in the worship experience. It’s a vital part of our lives, since even our souls require divine nourishment from time to time. As a pastor or church leader, you instill these feelings in your congregation, and feed off of it while it binds everyone together with warmth, security, and trust in God.

steel church buildingIt’s obvious ‘church’ is more than just a building. It’s more important than that. Even a united congregation will face decisions that affect the future of the site it holds most dear. As your congregation grows, many decide on a steel church building to satisfy the specialized needs of the flock. The process of planning and erecting a new building has the potential to test your flock’s conviction, so you’ll need to go about it the right way. That’s why you can’t go cheap on your steel church building.

In the construction industry, you get what you pay for, and many times the cheapest building has the cheapest materials and cheapest standards. The quality is inferior and the parts don’t last, and the company producing these materials saves a ton on production costs. That’s not the type of building you want for your community of faith. As a pastor or church leader, you build your spiritual foundation on solid ground, just as you would a steel church building.

The cheapest buildings might have not the design and engineering planned out properly. Those buildings could be manufactured with minimum load specifications in your area, and you’re cheating yourself out of the strongest building possible. Many times, the cheapest buildings actually become the most expensive. Costly on-site modifications and delays for repairing subpar equipment and craftsmanship aren’t in your church’s budget, nor should it be.

Money can also be a sore subject in the church landscape. But people want to spend money on what fulfills them and makes them feel whole. That’s the job of the church! Still, when you start and foster a capital campaign, you’ll raise your congregation’s hard-earned money. It needs to be spent efficiently and on the right resources.steel church building

An Armstrong Building is engineered and customized to your specifications, local codes and loads. Labor costs are significantly decreased because our systems fit together seamlessly. We fixate on the purpose of every purlin and girt, connector plate and fastener, simply because we understand the meaning behind your steel church building. Supply us with all your needs, and we’ll design a building that will make your congregation proud. We’ll do it right the first time, so your congregation can get back to worship.

Expansion is a truly a delicate procedure. For many churches, a building program can be intimidating. The fundamentals of any expansion program include planning for your facility needs. If your current facilities are outdated or ministries are fighting for space, it might be the right time to build. Don’t assume, “if you build it, they will come,” either. You will know when it’s time, but have to come to the building conclusion as a congregation. You will have questions on how to progress, and this growth into a steel church building should be a mission God wants you to accomplish.

steel church buildingClose your eyes, and picture the organ, bells, and choir echoing throughout your new steel church building. We know it’s more than four walls and a roof. It’s an Armstrong Building. It’s a sanctuary, a place of worship, and your spiritual home. It deserves to be treated as such.

Your road map to the future begins here. Take the next step and price your building now!

Photo courtesy: Luke Jones

 

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